Why do you need the KTM Twins Billet Fuel Filler assembly, it’s just a gas cap, right? Wrong. It’s really an anodized CNC-ed work of art, designed to complement the looks of your KTM 690 Enduro R, and solve a few problems. Problem number 1: you have a soft bag on the back of your bike behind the seat, and every time you want to refuel (which is often, if all you have is the stock fuel capacity), you basically have to remove the bag to get enough room to put the key in and remove the stock filler cap. I think it will be much easier to loosen the twist cap and get the filler hose in the tank, and won’t require almost completely removing your soft bags to get at the cap. Problem number 2 which is less of a nuisance and more of a problem: the stock triangular piece, when removed, can allow dirt that has accumulated down in the recession to fall into the tank and get in your fuel system, which can hurt your purty lil motor. Problem solved. Finally, as KTM Twins explains in the instructions, if you ever lose your billet cap for some reason, you can can always replace it with an easily attainable ACERBIS small gas cap. So don’t lose your billet one, because it’s way cooler.

Now the negatives. The instructions in my kit were not super clear. The stock filler assembly must be completely removed from the top of the tank, which is easy enough, BUT BE EXTRA CAREFUL that you don’t drop any of the short OEM bolts into the tank, (Brad). The KTM Twins kit comes with a spacer and extra O-ring. This is confusing. The instructions say in bold on the first page: “Special Note: Your kit comes with an additional O-Ring and Spacer Plate. Please make sure to use this spacer in your installation.” But later in the instructions, it says to use the spacer plate and O-Ring “…if applicable to your year.” It would be nice if they had a fitment chart that said which year needs the spacer.

I installed it without the spacer plate, then thought I should reassemble it with the spacer plate. In retrospect, with the spacer plate, the whole assembly say too high above the bodywork of my bike and just didn’t look right, so I reassembled without the spacer plate, and it looks much better. Unless someone at KTM Twins tells me I did it wrong, I’m sticking with this option, as it looks better and it seems to have a nice tight seal with the tank.

I would say this is must-have farkle for your 690 Enduro R if you do any amount of adventure touring.

KTM Twins billet filler cap for the 690 Enduro R.

KTM Twins billet filler cap for the 690 Enduro R.

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6 years after I first tried the Great Basin dual sport soft luggage bag by Giant Loop, I am amazed at how well-made these things are, and frankly, how convenient they are for a variety of moto situations. The one I have was sent to me when Giant Loop had just launched this model, and I did a tour through the San Juan mountains of Colorado on my 2009 BMW F800 GS. Since then, I have used it, abused it, loaned it to friends, and most recently ignored it, thinking it was too big and burly for my svelte KTM 690 Enduro R, but on a recent weekend trip to Baker, NV, and the Great Basin National Park (of all places), I thought it would be worth revisiting this fine piece of dual sport essential equipment.

Darth and I were not well-prepared for this trip. Darth usually has our GPS routes mapped out, the boxes on his BMW F800 stuffed and strapped with everything you can imagine. This trip came up very last minute. We winged it, old school. We were both on 690s, his all Rally Raided out to the max, mine not yet broken in. Carrying extra fuel was our main concern, since my bike only had the stock tank. I had previously added the Rally Raid soft luggage racks to my bike with Rotopax mounts (all available from KTMTwins.com), and was carrying a 1 gallon Rotopax fuel tank, and a 1 gallon water tank. Neither one of us had any plans to carry anything other than what we could fit in our pockets or in small tail bags (like my Kriega 20 liter). When we realized we had no room for even a bag of trail mix or the Utah Gazetteer that we needed since we were going sans-GPS, I remembered the dusty old Great Basin in the corner…

Sometimes the more room you have, the more you bring. Sometimes, if you didn’t bring it, you don’t need it. Sometimes it’s just nice t have a little extra room. The Great Basin was perfect for this trip because it was very cold in the mornings, but warmed up to desert temps in the afternoon. We had a place to stuff mid layers as the days warmed. The Great Basin draped nicely over the RR rack and Rotopax, and I hardly knew it was there while riding.

I went back to the Giant Loop site thinking I might get one of their smaller bag set-ups like the Coyote, and I still might. But for now, the 6 year old, beat up but still clean and dry inside original Great Basin bag does a lot to make my 690 a viable dual sport. If you were thinking about buying one and wondered how well they hold up, quit your worrying and just get one.

On the Pony Express trail with the Great Basin bag.

On the Pony Express trail with the Great Basin bag.

This is not the causeway you were looking for.

This is not the causeway you were looking for.

The bag perched nicely on the back of the KTM 690 Enduro R.

The bag perched nicely on the back of the KTM 690 Enduro R.

“I am a child of the winds.”

I recently said Adieu to my 2009 BMW F800 GS. I can’t exactly say I replaced the BMW with a 2014 KTM 690 Enduro R, because it was never supposed to be an either/or proposition, it just sort of happened that way. Ever since the Morocco trip, I’ve had my eyes on one. As they say, good things come to those who know when to pull the trigger. So now I cautiously embark on a journey of making the 690 just right for the riding I currently do. For the time being, that means making it a little more functional for the pavement. Out of the crate, the 690 Enduro R is a big giant dirt bike. The KTM Hardparts Touring Windscreen (or Windschild as the Austrians call it) caught my attention. I bought mine from KTM Twins in San Francisco. Nice folks, very helpful, fast shipping, all that fun stuff, and I’m not being paid to say this. The part itself is about $70 and easy to install.

KTM 690 Enduro R Touring Windscreen

Child of the Winds

 

Step 1: take headlight and mask assembly off by loosening 2 torx bolts. Here is a helpful tip: put a towel or clean rag on top of your front fender so you have a place to rest the headlight after you take the bolts out and proceed to step 2.

Step 2: unplug the wiring from the headlight.

Step 3: unscrew headlight from the mask. 4 torx screws.

Step 4: use the provided template to drill 4 small pilot holes in the mask. Or clamp the windscreen to the mask approximately where you want it by eyeballing it. I used a couple of welding spring clips. The template seemed a little “off” when I checked it before drilling, so I used the template as a rough guide, then clamped everything together and drilled pilot holes using the windscreen holes to be precise.

Step 5: after you feel good about your pilot holes, you are going to drill pretty big holes, 9mm in diameter, according to the installation instructions. This is so the provided bushings press in nice and tight.

Step 6: Bolt that shit together.

This is what it looks like attached to the stock mask.

This is what it looks like attached to the stock mask.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here is the finished result…

KTM 690 Enduro R Touring Windscreen

Installed. About 45 minutes of fiddling, that’s all.

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